Manor Farm: Manor of Evesden: Perrers Manor: Great Eversden Manor.

PRIVATE PROPERTY

 

  • Great Eversden, Cambridgeshire
  • Scheduled Monument
  • Monument Number 368968

 

Medieval moat.

John Tiptoft, Earl of Worcester was born at the Manor.

 

1087                            Held by Humphrey de Andeville.

1166                            Held by Ernulf de Bosco.

1208                            Hamelin de Andeville was Lord of the Manor.

1235                            Richard de Andeville held the manor.

1279                            Held by Sir Robert Hoo and his wife, Beatrice, possibly the daughter of Alexander de Andeville.

1302-1316                   Between: Robert died.

1316                            Beatrice granted the manor to Richard Perrers and his wife Joan (possibly Beatrice’s daughter).

1335                            Richard, son of Richard and Joan, died leaving his son, Edmund.

1346                            Edmund’s widow held the manor.

1373-1374                   Went to Beatrice’s grandson, Sir Thomas Hoo and he granted it to Sir Edmund Walshingham and his wife, Isabel.

1381                            Sir Edmund Walshingham died

1381                            During the Peasants Revolt the house was attacked and items taken from it.

1382                            The manor was vacant after being confiscated for being under suspicion of rebellion by Richard II. The house, moat and drawbridge were recorded.

1389                            Sir William Castleacre lived at the manor. A license was granted to Sir William Castleacre to have an oratory.

1397                            Sir William Castleacre was arrested and Sir William Hoo, Thomas Hoo’s son, took possession of the manor.

1398                            Sir William Castleacre tried to recover the manor.

1403                            Called Perrers Manor. Sir William Hoo claimed legal rights to the manor.

1404                            c: Sir William Castleacre died.

1409                            After the lease was up, Sir Pain Tiptoft bought the manor following the death of Elizabeth Castleacre.

1413-1427                   Sir Pain Tiptoft died and his son, John, Lord Tiptoft held the manor

1443                            Lord Tiptoft died and his widow, Joyce held the manor.

1445                            c: Joyce died and her son, John, a minor, inherited.

1447                            John came of age and took possession of the manor.

1449                            John Tiptoft was created Lord of Worcester.

1470                            John was executed and his son, Edward, a minor, inherited.

1485                            Edward died, still a minor, and the manor went to Joan, Sir Edward Ingoldthorpe’s widow.

1491                            Joan gave the manor to Queen’s College, Cambridge, to secure a yearly payment of £13 6s 8d to the London house of Blackfriers.

1597                            Queen’s College leased it to John Hale.

1600                            c: Built as a farm next to the site of the original building. Had two storey’s with a central range and cross wings.

17 C                            Out buildings.

18 C                            Extended, remodeled and enlarged.

1948                            Until: Held by the College, who then sold off the land to farmers.

1973                            Field Investigation.

 

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